An online post asks:

“Ever dream of digging a hole straight through to the other side of the earth as a kid? Well, if it were somehow possible, the kids in tiny Rudyard, Montana would be the only ones in the U.S. who'd actually emerge on dry land”

 

I checked. A website built to find the corresponding spot on our planet failed to land me in the promised windswept but dry land of the Kergeulen islands which is antipodal to Rudyard MT. The Kerguelen Islands, also known as the Desolation Islands, are a group of islands in the southern Indian Ocean. Though lastbestnews did.

“That fact is this: The tiny burg of Rudyard is the only community in the United States that sits atop a non-oceanic antipode. In other words, if you went straight through the Earth from every other city, town or census-designated place in the United States, you would come out the other side of the globe in salt water.”

"Only in Rudyard, population roughly 250, does the exactly opposite point of the globe consist of land, and then only by a whisker.”

Greg Pixophil via YouTube

They also say

“A bit of northern Alaska is antipodal to Antarctic lands, and a few uninhabited specks of central Colorado are opposite a couple of islands that, like the Kerguelens, are lost in the vast reaches of the southern Indian Ocean, but Rudyard is the only town in the United States antipodal to terra firma.”

I figure Hawaii is in the US and that same site showed the other side of the globe from Honolulu, Hawaii was Botswana, Africa.

 

But for every kid who thought of digging straight through the earth from a starting point in Wyoming, you would pop out in salt water. Now you know.