This past Saturday was Record Store Day, a day that honors independent record shops with bands offering up special releases, limited editions and rarities for purchase at local music shops. Well, you may have heard that there was a little problem with one of the special releases in the U.K. that involved U2 and Tool.

Here's what happened: Several U2 fans took to Twitter to report that what was supposed to be a special vinyl edition of U2’s 2014 Songs of Innocence album was in actuality Tool’s 1992 EP Opiate. As a result, Tool are having some fun with the mishap at U2's expense.

A post on Tool's Facebook page reads: "NICE FREAKIN' TRY, U2... Some very lucky people who purchased U2's Songs Of Innocence during a recent record store release found instead a copy of TOOL's 1992 OPIATE EP inside." The band's official website adds, "Kind of makes you believe in mysterious higher powers doesn't it."

Fact first broke the story this weekend, after spotting a tweet from a U2 fan who received one of the misprints. Since then a U.K label manager has tweeted that the Tool music in the U2 sleeves happened because of an error at the pressing plant where they were both being made. You can check out Diffuser to read more.

This isn't the first misstep with U2’s album Songs of Innocence. If you recall, this was the album that appeared in every iTunes users' library for free. The band received backlash for this decision (from famous people like Foo Fighters drummer Taylor Hawkins and Sharon Osbourne), as some felt it was a violation of their privacy, especially because at first people could not, even if they wanted to, delete the music.

As far as Tool are concerned, guitarist Adam Jones recently said that the band is currently creating new music for the long-awaited follow-up to their last full length disc 10,000 Days. He said of the music, "Some of it's really heavy, some of it's really complex and some is more atmospheric, but it's definitely Tool."

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