A man who had his sentence reduced after robbing two Casper gas stations in 2015 had his probation revoked for running from Rock Springs Police and DUI charges.

On Monday, Natrona County District Court Judge Daniel Forgey sentenced Brandon Reeder to five-to-nine years behind bars. In 2016, Reeder pleaded guilty to two counts of aggravated robbery. He was initially given a 9- to 17-year prison sentence. However, Forgey reduced that after Reeder completed boot camp.

Reeder was 17 at the time of the robberies.

Court documents say Reeder held up two Casper gas stations with an Airsoft gun.

During the sentencing hearing Monday afternoon, roughly a half-dozen friends and family were in the courtroom to support Reeder. They all said Reeder's run-ins with the law were the result of a crippling drinking problem.

Reeder's most recent arrest happened in Rock Springs during the early hours of June 23.

In an affidavit of probable cause, a Rock Springs police officer describes being on patrol and seeing Reeder, in a 2019 Dodge Challenger, blow through a red light at 60 mph.

The officer got behind Reeder at a red light and tried to pull him over, but Reeder took off instead.

According to the affidavit, Reeder sped through several additional stop signs before the officer lost sight of him. Not long after, the officer was notified of a Dodge Challenger that had crashed into a tree. When the officer arrived, Reeder had run away.

In that incident, Reeder had a blood alcohol level of .24%, an addiction counselor who treated him said. The legal limit to safely drive in Wyoming is .08%.

Reeder's attorney, Hampton Young, said his client has been successful in getting his life on track after the 2015 robberies. In those cases, Reeder was so drunk that he didn't remember committing the robbery, Young said.

Assistant Natrona County District Attorney Trevor Schenk noted that Reeder had already been given a second chance.

"What does he do with that?" the prosecutor asked. "Thankfully, no one was seriously injured.

"What he's asking for is a third chance. That's twice now that he's put two communities at risk."

For his part, Reeder said he'd worked on his addiction issues. He never thought he'd be back in a courtroom staring down a prison sentence.

Reeder said his addiction treatment was largely successful. Since getting out of bootcamp, he'd found steady employment and his own place to live.

Young said Reeder takes responsibility for a June relapse that led to being back in a courtroom on Monday.

"I never thought this would happen," Young said. "He's very disappointed in himself. He thinks he's the worst person in the world."

Forgey called the circumstances of Monday's hearing "quite unfortunate," and said Reeder is well-meaning and has clearly made strides to improve himself.

Unfortunately, Forgey added, Reeder made a series of serious mistakes that landed him back in prison. While Reeder's progress over the past few years mitigates those errors, they still warrant time behind bars, Forgey said.

When the hearing concluded, a sheriff's deputy escorted Reeder from the courtroom.